Great but obscure research

Updated: 2007-04-01
Created: 2004-09-20

This document is an incomplete draft.

DBMSes

Ingres and Quel
  • %A M. Stonebraker
    %A G. Wong
    %A P. Kreps
    %A G. Held
    %T The design and implementation of INGRES
    %J TODS
    %V 1
    %D MAR 1976
    %P 189-222
    %K data base database
  • %A M. R. Stonebraker
    %T Operating system support for database management
    %J CACM
    %V 24
    %D JUL 1981
    %P 412-418
    %K data base
Query-by-Example
  • %A M. M. Zloof
    %T Query-by-Example: the Invocation and Definition of Tables and Forms
    %J VLDB
    %D SEP 1975
    %P 1-24
    %K data base database
The Multics RDMS

Database research

Domain based relational databases
Temporal RDBMSes
The 5 types of relations and 3 types of connections
From Gio Wiederhold's Database design, 2nd edition, chapter 7.
These are the essential relation types:
Primary entity relation
  • Not referenced within the view model.
  • The ruling part defines the entity.
  • The existence of tuples is determined externally, i.e., by the user.
Referenced entity relation.
  • Referenced from within the view model.
  • The ruling part defines the entity and establishes domains for referencing attributes. A ruling part typically has a single attribute.
  • Existence of tuples is determined externally, but deletion is constrained by existing references.
Nest relation.
  • Each tuple must have an owner tuple within the view model.
  • The ruling part defines one specific owner and the tuple within the owned set.
  • An owned nest can have zero or more tuples.
Associative relation.
  • Each tuple has n owners within the view model.
  • The ruling part defines each of n specific owners only.
  • One combination of owners can have 0 or 1 tuple in the association.
Lexicon relation.
  • Referenced within the view model.
  • Either part can be the ruling part.
  • The existence of tuples is determined externally but deletion is constrained by existing references.
  • Its existence is transparent to the model.
There are also subrelations:
  • Referenced from any general relation.
  • The ruling part matches the ruling part of the general relation.
  • The dependent part contains attributes which do not apply to non­matching tuples within the general relation.
  • Insertion requires existence of a matching tuple in the general relation.
The generalization of subclasses to larger classes is essential to data-processing; the recognition of individual subclasses and the collection of detailed data is important to give depth to the database and is often needed in specific views.
The integrated database model has typically a much higher fraction of subrelations than the individual view models. During integration in Sec. 7-5 we will see how such subrelations are created.
There are 3 connection types:
Reference connections.
From single to multiple owned tuples.
In the models we identified primary entity relations and Reference connections referenced entity relations. Other relation types may also include references; we will use the term primary relations for all referencing relations.
Primary relations contain attributes whose values reference tuples of the referenced relation. A tuple of the referenced entity relation provides a more detailed description for the entity or abstraction named by the referencing attribute of the primary relation.
We expect to find tuples in a referenced relation to match any value assumed by the referencing attribute; absence of a referenced tuple constitutes an error. A referenced relation hence defines the domain for the referencing attribute.
Reference rules: The ruling part of a referenced relation matches the referencing attribute of the primary or referencing relation. Tuples in referenced relations may not be removed while any reference exists. The removal of referencing tuples from the primary relation does not imply removal of the corresponding referenced tuple.
Ownership connections.
From multiple to single referenced tuples.
They are used to define a specific type of MVD (Eq. 7-6), namely, the case where the dependent attributes of each tuple themselves form similar sets or relations, rather than arbitrary sets. We refer to these sets as the owned set; a specific form was called a nest. The owned relation will have one owned set for each tuple of the owning relation.
Ownership rules: The ruling part of the owned relation is the catenation of the ruling part of the owner relation and an attribute to distinguish individuals in the owned sets. A new tuple can be inserted into the owned relation only if there is a matching owner tuple in the owning relation. Deletion of an owner tuple implies deletion of its owned set.
Subset connections.
From single general to single subset tuples.
A subset connection is needed when we find relations with formally identical ruling parts, but differing attributes or domains.
Subset relations occur frequently. We may want to collect attributes for managers or sales staff that are not needed for other employees, as was shown in Example 7-5. We may collect data on classes of vehicles such as cars, buses, and trucks. which have many commonalities and some differences.
Subset rules: The ruling part of a subrelation matches the ruling part of its connected general relation. Every subset tuple depends on one general tuple. A general tuple may have no or one tuple in any connected subset relation.
Wiederhold points out, without much further argument, the however entirely plausible observation that:
It is possible to create from these basic semantic types other forms of relations which satisfy special conditions.
A synthesis of published material indicates that these five types, plus the concepts of subrelations, cover the semantic possibilities controlling the structure of databases in an economic and conceptually convenient manner.
Combinations of ownership and reference connections, for instance, lead to four types of n · m relationships among two relations. Each of the four cases has distinctive semantics.

Architectures

The PDP-1 and why it was built
%E P. A. Crisman
%B The Compatible Time-Sharing System
%I MITP
%K ctss mit
%C Cambridge (Massachussets)
%D 1965
MU4 ATLAS reverse mapped virtual memory
  • %A Tom Kilburn
    %A D. J. Howarth
    %A R. B. Payne
    %A F. H. Sumner
    %T The Manchester UNIV ATLAS operating system \- part 1
    %J COMPJOUR
    %V 4
    %D 1961
    %P 3-10
  • %A Tom Kilburn
    %A Dai B. G. Edwards
    %A M. J. Lanigan
    %A F. H. Sumner
    %T One level storage systems
    %J IRE Transactions
    %V 11
    %N 2
    %D APR 1962
    %P 223-235
    %K manchester virtual memory
  • %A Derrick Morris
    %A F. H. Sumner
    %A M. T. Wyld
    %T An appraisal of the ATLAS supervisor
    %B PROC ACM CONF
    %D 1967
    %K manchester
Burroughs 1700
Burroughs mainframes
  • %A E. I. Organick
    %B Computer systems organization: the B5700/B6700 series
    %I ACPRESS
    %S ACM Monograph
    %C New\ York (New\ York)
    %D 1973
The MU5 architecture
  • %A Derrick Morris
    %A Roland N. Ibbett
    %B The MU5 computer system
    %I MacMillan
    %S Computer Science Series
    %D 1980
    %K manchester muss
  • %A F. H. Sumner
    %A J. V. Woods
    %T The MU5 computer system
    %J RAIRO Informatique
    %V 10
    %N 1
    %D JAN 1976
    %P 109-130
    %K manchester
  • %A S. S. Thakkar
    %B A high performance virtual memory management unit for a supermini computer
    %S Ph.D. Thesis
    %I UNIV of Manchester
    %D APR 1982
    %C Manchester (England)
    %K mu6-g
  • %A S. S. Thakkar
    %B Investigation of buffer store organisation
    %S M.Sc. DISS
    %I UNIV of Manchester
    %D 1978
  • %A F. H. Sumner
    %T MU5 \- an assessment of the design
    %B IFIP 74
    %I NHOLL
    %C Amsterdam (Holland)
    %D 1974
    %K manchester
  • %A F. H. Sumner
    %T Multi-access computing and virtual addressing
    %K manchester memory time sharing timesharing
    %B Infotech State of the Art report \- virtual storage
    %I Infotech International
    %C Maidenhead (England)
    %D 1976
  • %A Derrick Morris
    %T Job control on ATLAS and MU5
    %B PROC BCS SYMP on JCL past present and future
    %I NCC
    %C Manchester (England)
    %D 1974
    %K muss
  • %A S. H. Lavington
    %A G. Thomas
    %A Dai B. G. Edwards
    %T The MU5 multicomputer communication system
    %J IEEETC
    %V 26
    %D 1977
    %P 19-28
    %K manchester
  • %A B. J. Parsons
    %T The design of the store access control system for the MU5 computer
    %S M.Sc. Thesis
    %I UNIV of Manchester
    %D 1971
  • %A W. J. Khaja
    %B The implementation of the name store and associated
    replacement algorithms in the MU5 computer
    %S Ph.D. Thesis
    %I UNIV of Manchester
    %D 1971
  • %A Allen E. Knowles
    %B The implementation of virtual storage in the MU5 computer complex
    %S Ph.D. Thesis
    %I UNIV of Manchester
    %D 1975
    %K mu5
  • %A Tom Kilburn
    %A Derrick Morris
    %A J. S. Rohl
    %A F. H. Sumner
    %T A system design proposal
    %B IFIP 68
    %I NHOLL
    %D 1969
    %K manchester
  • %A N. A. Yannacopoulos
    %A Roland N. Ibbett
    %A R. W. Holgate
    %T Performance measurements of the MU5 primary instruction pipeline
    %B IFIP 77
    %I NHOLL
    %C Amsterdam (Holland)
    %D 1977
  • %A Dai B. G. Edwards
    %A A. E. Whitehouse
    %A L. E. M. Warburton
    %A I. Watson
    %T The MU5 disc system
    %B IEEE CONF PROC
    %V 121
    %C London (England)
    %D 1974
    %K manchester
  • %A M. A. Husband
    %A Roland N. Ibbett
    %A R. Phillips
    %T The MU5 computer monitoring system
    %B PROC of the European Computing CONF on computer performance evaluation
    %C London (England)
    %D 1976
    %K manchester
  • %A Roland N. Ibbett
    %A E. C. Phillips
    %A Dai B. G. Edwards
    %T Control of the MU5 pipeline
    %B IERE CONF PROC
    %V 25
    %D 1972
    %C London (England)
    %K manchester
  • %A Roland N. Ibbett
    %A M. A. Husband
    %T The MU5 name store
    %J COMPJOUR
    %V 20
    %D 1977
    %P 227-231
    %K manchester
  • %A Roland N. Ibbett
    %T The MU5 instruction pipeline
    %J COMPJOUR
    %V 15
    %D 1972
    %K manchester
The MU6-G and MU6-P architectures
  • %A Dai B. G. Edwards
    %A Allan E. Knowles
    %A John Vivian Woods
    %T MU6-G: a new design to achieve mainframe performance
    from a mini-sized computer
    %O PROC 7th SYMP on Computer Architecture
    %J SIGARCH
    %V 8
    %N 3
    %D 1980
    %K manchester
  • %A A. C. Willis
    %B MU6-G store management
    %S M.Sc. DISS
    %I UNIV of Manchester
    %D 1979
  • %A S. H. Lavington
    %B History of Manchester computers
    %I National Computing Centre
    %C Manchester (England)
    %D 1975
    %K atlas mu5 mu6
  • %A S. H. Lavington
    %A Allen E. Knowles
    %J Assessing the power of an order code
    %B IFIP 77
    %I NHOLL
    %C Amsterdam (Holland)
    %D 1977
    %K manchester mu6
  • %A Dai B. G. Edwards
    %A OTHERS
    %T MU6-G description
    %R (internal memo)
    %I UNIV of Manchester DCS
    %D 1979
  • %A Y. L. Husband
    %B Operand buffering in high speed computers
    %S Ph.D. Thesis
    %I UNIV of Manchester
    %D 1976
    %K mu6-g
The Cambridge CAP computer
The Lisp Machine(s)
  • %A R. Greenblatt
    %T The LISP machine
    %R 79
    %S Working Paper
    %I MIT AI LAB
    %D NOV 1974
The Apollo system
The Three Rivers Perq
With the operating system, Accent, that evolved into CMU MACH, and the ICL PNX and the RSRE Flex.
  • %A Richard Rashid
    %A G. Robertson
    %T Accent: a communication oriented network operating system kernel
    %B PROC 8th SOSP
    %C Pacific Grove (California)
    %D DEC 1981
    %P 64-75
The Xerox Alto, Dolphin, Dorado and STAR
  • %A C. P. Thacker
    %A OTHERS
    %T Alto: a personal computer
    %B Computer structures: readings and examples
    %E Siewiorek
    %E Bell
    %E Newell
    %I MGHILL
    %D 1981
    %A D. C. Smith
    %A OTHERS
    %T Designing the STAR user interface
    %J Byte
    %V 7
    %N 4
    %D APR 1982
    %P 242-282
  • %A D. W. Clark
    %A B. W. Lampson
    %A K. A. Pier
    %T The memory system of a high performance personal minicomputer
    %J IEEETC
    %V 30
    %N 12
    %D DEC 1978
    %K dorado xerox
CM* and Hydra from CMU
  • William Wulf, Roy Levin, and Samuel Harbison. Hydra/C.mmp: An Experimental Computer System. McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1981.
  • %A W. Wulf
    %A OTHERS
    %T HYDRA: the kernel of a multiprocessor operating system
    %J CACM
    %V 17
    %D JUN 1974
    %P 337-345
SCOMP for the Honeywell Level 6
  • %A Lester J. Fraim
    %T SCOMP: a solution to the multilevel security problem
    %J COMP
    %D JUL 1983
    %P 26-34
The RSRE Flex architecture
Algol 68 capability based OS on the UK SERC version of the 3R Perq.
  • %A J. M. Foster
    %A I. F. Currie
    %A P. W. Edwards
    %T Flex: A working computer with an architecture based on procedure values
    %B PROC of the INTER Workshop on high level architecture
    %D 1982
    %C Ft.\ Lauderdale (Florida)
    %P 181-185
  • %A I. F. Currie
    %A J. M. Foster
    %T Curt: The command intepreter language for Flex
    %R RSRE MEMO 3522
    %D 1982
Manchester Dataflow machine
  • %A J. R. Gurd
    %A C. C. Kirkham
    %A Ian Watson
    %T The Manchester prototype dataflow computer
    %J Communications of the CACM (CACM)
    %D January 1985
    %P 34-52
    %V 28
    %N 1
    %K data flow CPU architecture tagged
    %X A tagged token data flow architecture. FIFO token
    queue/buffer smooths token creation and use. Instruction packets
    are sent to the first available processing unit matching the
    packet. Runs large user programs at maximum rates of between 1
    and 2 MIPS in 1985. Almost linear speedup with the number of
    processing units for suitable programs.
    %A Ian Watson
    %T Hashing in the Manchester dataflow prototype
    %D MAR 1983
    %R (private communication)
  • %A J. R. Gurd
    %A Ian Watson
    %T A multilayered dataflow architecture
    %B PROC International CONF parallel processing
    %D AUG 1977
    %P 94
    %K manchester data flow

Architecture research

Most capability architectures
  • %A R. S. Fabry
    %T Capability based addressing
    %J CACM
    %V 17
    %D JUL 1974
    %P 403-412
ORSLA and distributed garbage collection
  • %A Peter Bishop
    %T Computer systems with a very large address space and garbage collection
    %K compaction capability data object oriented
    %I MIT LCS
    %R 178
    %D MAY 1977
    %X The landmark dissertation on ORSLA, a totally object oriented system with
    very large address spaces, weakly linked areas subject to separate
    garbage collection, etc...
  • %A Peter Bishop
    %T Garbage collection in a very large address space
    %R 111
    %S Working Paper
    %D SEP 1975
    %I MIT AI LAB
    %X This details the garbage collection algorithm to be used in a very large
    address space divided into areas with weak links among them and thus
    independently collectable.

Operating systems

The MUSS operating system
Segments, filesystem as persistent segment list, more segments than mappings, moving instead of sharing segments, process ids containing both unique id and slot number, two layer scheduler with low level mask, shell as intepreter over shared libraries, abstract model of device states.
  • %A Colin Theaker
    %A G. R. Frank
    %T The design of the MUSS operating system
    %J SPE
    %V 9
    %P 599-620
    %D 1979
    %K manchester
    %A Derrick Morris
    %A Roland N. Ibbett
    %B The MU5 computer system
    %I MacMillan
    %S Computer Science Series
    %D 1980
    %K manchester muss
    %A Derrick Morris
    %A G. R. Frank
    %A Colin J. Theaker
    %T Machine independent operating systems
    %B PROC IFIP 1977
    %I IFIP
    %P 819-825
    %K muss
    %A Peter Charles Capon
    %A Derrick Morris
    %A J. S. Rohl
    %A I. R. Wilson
    %T The MU5 Compiler Target Language and autocode
    %K muss manchester generator portability
    %J COMPJOUR
    %V 15
    %D 1972
    %P 109-112
    %A Peter Charles Capon
    %A Roland N. Ibbett
    %A C. R. B. C. Parker
    %T The implementation of records processing in MU5
    %K muss manchester generator portability
    %B IEEE CONF PROC
    %V 121
    %D 1974
    %C London (England)
The PDP-10 and T[w]enex and user space VM managers
  • %A Daniel G. Bobrow
    %A J. D. Burchfiel
    %A D. L. Murphy
    %A R. S. Tomlinson
    %T TENEX, a Paged Time Sharing System for the PDP-10
    %K operating virtual memory
    %J CACM
    %V 15
    %N 3
    %D MAR 1972
    %K tenex
    %P 135-143
  • %A D. L. Murphy
    %T Storage organization and management in TENEX
    %B FJCC
    %D 1972
    %P 25-32
    %K virtual memory paging
  • %A R. Corben
    %T Controllable virtual storage for DEC System 10
    %B Infotech state of the art report \- Virtual storage
    %I Infotech International
    %C Maidenhead (England)
    %D 1976
Most software capability architectures
The KeyKOS operating system architecture
Thoth
Operating system written in the B language (intermediate between BCPL and C), based on cheap packet passing. Evolved into the commercial QNX operating system.
  • David R. Cheriton M. A. Malcolm L. S. Melen G. R. Sager. Thoth, A Portable Real-Time Operating System. Communications of the ACM February 1979.
  • %A D. R. Cheriton
    %A M. A. Malcom
    %A L. S. Melen
    %A G. R. Sager
    %T Thoth, a portable real-time operating system
    %J CACM
    %D FEB 1979
    %P 105-115
    %K realtime real time distributed ipc waterloo b level\ 6
    %X From this thoth thing, written at Waterloo on a Honeywell Level 6,
    was V designed.
  • %A David R. Cheriton
    %B The Thoth system: multi process structuring and portability
    %K operating system waterloo level\ 6
    %I NHOLL
    %D 1982
TSS/370
MERT and UNIX/RT hypervisor
  • D. L. Bayer, H. Lycklama, MERT - a multi-environment real-time operating system, (Fifth ACM Symposium on Operating Systems Principles, Austin, Texas, 1975)
  • H. Lycklama, D. L. Bayer, The MERT Operating System (The Bell System Technical Journal, July-August 1978, Vol. 57, No. 6, Part 2)

Operating system research

Page Fault Frequency replacement policy
Share scheduler from Cambridge
  • G. J. Henry The fair share scheduler AT&T Bell Lab.Tech. J. 1845-1857 63, 8 (Oct.).
  • Judy Kay Piers Lauder A Fair Share Scheduler CACM, 31:1, 44-55 January 1988
  • %A J. Larmouth
    %T Scheduling for a share of the machine
    %J SPE
    %V 5
    %N 1
    %D JAN 1975
    %P 29-49
    %K JOB initiation
  • %A J. Larmouth
    %T Scheduling for immediate turnround
    %J SPE
    %V 8
    %D 1978
    %P 559-578
    %K job initiation
The Xerox Network protocols
The PUP and XNS designs were quite interesting and different from the now dominant IP. Novell's IPX was basically XNS rebranded.
  • %A D. R. Boggs
    %A OTHERS
    %T Pup: an internetwork architecture
    %J IEEE Transactions on Communication
    %V 28
    %N 4
    %D APR 1980
    %P 612-624
    %K inter network protocol
    %X Describes the architecture of the PUP Xerox protocol suite. Very
    important.
Naming and scalability
  • Naming Issues in the Design of Transparently Distributed Operating Systems: Absolute addressing works but does not scale, relative addressing scale but does not work.
  • %A Robert Stroud
    %T Naming Issues in the Design of Transparently Distributed Operating Systems. 
    %P Department of Computing Science, University of Newcastle upon Tyne
    %D 1987
    %X British Lending Library DSC stock location number: DX80202
Ficus filesystem from UCLA

Languages

Simula 67
  • %A Ole Johan Dahl
    %A K. Nygaard
    %T SIMULA \- an ALGOL-based simulation language
    %J CACM
    %V 9
    %D SEP 1966
    %P 671-678
  • %A Ole Johan Dahl
    %A Bjorn Myhrhaug
    %A Kristen Nygaard
    %T Simula 67: common base language
    %S Publication
    %R S-22
    %I Norwegian Computing Centre
    %C Oslo (Norway)
    %D OCT 1970
    %K class classes generators
Algol 68
  • %A Aad Van\ Wijngaarden
    %A OTHERS
    %T Revised report on the algorithmic language Algol 68
    %J ACTA
    %V 5
    %D 1975
    %K two level grammars algol68
Algol 68C and ZCODE
  • %A Stephen R. Bourne
    %A A. D. Birrell
    %A I. Walker
    %T Algol 68C Reference Manual
    %I Cambridge UNIV Computer LAB
    %C Cambridge (Great Britain)
    %D 1975
The MDL language from MIT's PRG
  • %A S. W. Galley
    %A G. Pfister
    %B The MDL programming language
    %I MIT LCS
    %D NOV 1975
The ALICE affix grammar based language from VU
BCPL
  • %A Martin Richards
    %A C. Whitby-Stevens
    %B BCPL \- the language and its compiler
    %I Cambridge UNIV Press
    %D 1979
    %C Cambdrige (Great\ Britain)
  • %A Martin Richards
    %T BCPL \- a tool for compiler writing and systems programming
    %J PROC of the spring JCC
    %D 1969
    %P 557-566
  • %A Martin Richards
    %T BCPL reference manual
    %R 69/1
    %S Technical Memo
    %I Cambridge UNIV Computer LAB
    %D 1969
CLOS
SL5
  • %A R. E. Griswold
    %A D. R. Hanson
    %T An Overview of SL5
    %J SIGPLAN
    %V 12
    %N 4
    %D APR 1977
    %P 40-50
  • %A R. E. Griswold
    %T String analysis and synthesis in SL5
    %B PROC ACM annual CONF 1976
    %D NOV 1976
    %P 410-414
  • %A R. E. Griswold
    %T The SL5 programming language and its use in goal directed programming
    %B PROC fifth Texas CONF on computing systems
    %D OCT 1976
    %P 1-5
The CUCH language
  • %A Carlo Bohm
    %T The CUCH as a formal and description language
    %K lambda calculus lisp recursive
    %E T. B. Steel
    %B Formal language description languages for computer programming
    %I NHOLL
    %C Amsterdam (Netherland)
    %D 1966
    %P 179-197
    %X Interesting paper on a pure lambda calculus language and its applications.
The TRAC language
Interlisp
  • %A W. Teitelman
    %B InterLISP reference manual
    %I XEROX PARC
    %D 1975
    %C Palo Alto (California)
  • %A R. R. Burton
    %A OTHERS
    %T Interlisp-D overview
    %B Papers on Interlisp-D
    %K lisp pseudo code environment
    %G SSL-80-4
    %I Xerox PARC
    %D 1981
    %C Palo Alto (California)
Smalltalk-76 and actor sytems
  • %A Carl E. Hewitt
    %B Description and theoretical analysis (using schemata) of PLANNER
    %S Ph.D. Thesis
    %I MIT
    %D 1972
Lisp 2
CONNIVER and MICROPLANNER
  • %A Gerald J. Sussman
    %A Drew V. McDermott
    %T CONNIVER reference manual
    %R 209
    %S AI Memo
    %I MIT AI LAB
    %D 1972
  • %A Gerald J. Sussman
    %A Terry Winograd
    %A Eugene Charniak
    %T MICROPLANNER reference manual
    %R 203a
    %S AI Memo
    %I MIT AI LAB
    %D 1972
POP-2 from Edinburgh AI
  • %A R. M. Burstall
    %A J. S. Collins
    %A R. J. Popplestone
    %B Programming in POP-2
    %K frozen functions streams lvalues
    %I Edinburgh UNIV Press
    %D 1971
    %C Edinburgh (Scotland)
  • %A R. Popplestone
    %T The design philosophy of POP-2
    %B Machine Intelligence 3
    %I ELSEVIER
    %D 1968
Jovial and parallel arrays
MOHLLs like PL/360, PL/G, Mary, RTL, ...

Language research

Two level and affix grammars
  • %A Aad Van\ Wijngaarden
    %T Recursive definition of syntax and semantics
    %E T. B. Steel
    %B Formal Language Description Languages for Computer Programming
    %I NHOLL
    %C Amsterdam
    %D 1966
    %P 13-24
    %K two level grammars algol algol68
  • %A Aad Van\ Wijngaarden
    %A OTHERS
    %T Revised report on the algorithmic language Algol 68
    %J ACTA
    %V 5
    %D 1975
    %K two level grammars algol68
Mutual tail recursion by Patrick Greussay
  • P. Greussay. Iterative Interpretation of Tail-Recursive LISP Procedures. TR 20-76, Université de Paris 8 - Vincennes, September 1976.
  • %A P. Greussay
    %B Iterative interpretation of tail recursive LISP procedures
    %I UNIV of Vincennes
    %R 20-76
    %C Paris (France)
    %D 1976
  • %A P. Greussay
    %T An iterative LISP solution to the Samefringe problem
    %J SIGART
    %P 14
    %D AUG 1976
    %K same fringe generators
Event driven compilation
J. P. Banâtre J. P. Routeau L. Trilling An event-driven compiling technique Communications of the ACM, Volume 22 Issue 1 January 1979
Baker's shallow/deep context switching
  • %A Henry G. Baker
    %T Shallow binding in LISP 1.5
    %K environment deep scope closure
    %R 138
    %S Working Paper
    %I MIT AI LAB
    %D JAN 1977
    %X The landmark paper on deep and shallow environment graphs. Very witty.

Programming techniques and research

Multiple assignment, rotation and sliding
Algebra of interfaces
From Bob Gautier.
The forward/backwards parsing from VU-MC Algol 68
Denotational semantics
  • %A R. D. Tennent
    %T The denotational semantics of programming languages
    %J CACM
    %V 19
    %N 8
    %D AUG 1976
    %P 437-453
  • %A Michael J. C. Gordon
    %I SPRINGER
    %D 1979
    %B The denotational description of programming languages: an introduction
    %K dynamic binding
Hash linking
  • %A Daniel G. Bobrow
    %T A note on hash linking
    %J CACM
    %V 18
    %D JUL 1975
    %P 413-414
    %X Just a little trick. The idea is to avoid putting pointers or other
    fields in data structures if most of them are going to be NIL. It is
    better to have a separate table in which to record the field only for
    those structures that do have it, and use the address of the structure
    as the key in the hash table.
Advising
The MDL repository (Calico?)
Object versioning
Optimistic locking
Drawing raster lines using grammars
Why our approach to performance evaluation is SDRAWKCAB

Text and display processing

The NeWS display and windowing system
The Mgr window system
The Etude word processor
  • %A M. Hammer
    %A R. Ilson
    %A T. Anderson
    %A M. Good
    %A L. Rosenstein
    %A B. Niamir
    %A S. Schoichet
    %A E. Gilbert
    %T The implementation of ETUDE, an integrated and interective document preparation system
    %P 137-146
    %B SIG\&PLAN SIG\&OA SYMP on text manipulation
    %D JUN 1981
    %C Portland (Oregon)
LOUT
  • Jeffrey H. Kingston The design and implementation of the Lout document formatting language Software Practice and Experience, Vol. 23 pages 1001-1041 1993